Cappanalaurabaun

Cappanalaurabaun is in the civil parish of Kilcummin. The civil Parish corresponds with the following Church of Ireland parish of Kilcummin, Galway West. In general the civil parish and the Church of Ireland parish are the same as is the case in the Kilcummin Oughterard area.

The Irish Form of Name: Ceapach na Lára Báine

Translation: The field of the white foal.

Cappanalaurabaun is in the Electoral Division of Letterfore, in Civil Parish of Kilcummin, in the Barony of Moycullen, in the County of Galway

County: Gaillimh/Galway

BARONY

Maigh Cuilinn/Moycullen

CIVIL PARISH

Cill Chuimín/Kilcummin

Archival records

scanned records (1)

Boundries:

Cappanalaurabaun borders the following other townlands:

Area:

Cappanalaurabaun has an area of:

  • 733,689 m² / 73.37 hectares / 0.7337 km²
  • 0.28 square miles
  • 181.30 acres / 181 acres, 1 rood, 7 perches

Information from Downs Survey

Townland of CAPPANALAURABAUN

Down Survey Name: Cappaghnalarybany
1641 Owner(s): McDonnell, Owen (Catholic)
1670 Owner(s): Bull, Samuel (Protestant)Jones, Sir Roger (Protestant)
County: Galway
Barony: Muckullin
Parish: Killcumyn
Unprofitable land: 6 plantation acres
Profitable land: 12 plantation acres
Forfeited: 12 plantation acres

http://downsurvey.tcd.ie/landowners.php#l1=McDonnell,+Owen&mc=53.474213,-9.463647&z=14

The Tithe Applotment Books:

 About the Records

Tithes were a tax on agricultural produce which was payable by the occupiers of agricultural land. They were the main source of income for the parish clergy of the Church of Ireland (the largest Protestant church and the church established by law). However, in many parishes a large part of the tithes were ‘appropriate’, which meant that they were payable to a bishop, cathedral chapter or other ecclesiastical recipient, or were ‘impropriate’, which generally meant that they were payable to a local landowner. The parishes used in the Tithe Applotment Books are civil or Church of Ireland parishes, which often differ in name and territory from Catholic parishes, Acts of Parliament of 1823 and 1832 provided for the conversion of tithes into a fixed charge on land, and specified the average price of wheat or oats in the parish in the seven years before 1821 as the basis on which the tithes would be calculated. They also extended the application of tithes to pasture, where previously they had been levied only on tillage.

This change in the law resulted in the valuation of individual holdings in almost all parishes containing agricultural land, in order to assess the portion of the tithes for which each occupier of land would be liable. The apportionment was recorded for each Church of Ireland parish in a Tithe Composition Applotment Book. The information was collected and the amounts were calculated by two Parochial Commissioners, one of whom was appointed by the cess-payers of the parish and the other by the relevant Diocese of the Church of Ireland. This procedure was carried out in over 2,500 parishes between the years 1823 and 1837.

The Tithe Applotment Books are in a variety of formats, from a few pages sewn together to elaborately bound volumes. In most cases they are written in manuscript throughout, although some consist of manuscript entries on printed questionnaires. The information in the books is broadly uniform and generally includes at least the name of occupier; the size of holding, the valuation and the tithe payable. In some cases more detailed information is provided. Some volumes have maps and most have certificates and correspondence attached.

The sub-divisions of the parish were recorded. Some of these subdivisions, such as ploughlands, ceased to be in official use after the six inch survey of the Ordnance Survey was completed in the 1840s. Only productive land was subject to tithe, and the books usually distinguish between this tithable land and untithable land such as roads or mountains. Tithable land was in some cases classified by quality, and a money value was given to each class. In some cases the proportion of tithe payable to the rector, vicar or lay proprietor of the tithes was set out. The column for observations was sometimes completed, with information about commonage, for example.

There are a number of other points that should be noted. The acreages given in the Tithe Applotment Books are in Irish or Plantation measure, which is 1.62 times larger than statute measure. Only occupiers of land at the time of the tithe composition are recorded, so not all heads of households living in a parish at the time are included. Only rural areas are systematically covered, although inhabitants of towns who held plots of cultivable land are included. The equivalent tax in urban areas, Minister’s Money, has left few records.

The Tithe Applotment Books are an important source of information for a wide variety of researchers of pre-Famine Ireland. They provide the first surviving national list of the occupiers of land, and are used by genealogists as a partial substitute for returns of the 1821 and 1831 censuses of population, which were destroyed in 1922. They also record information on the quality of land, and provide information on pre-Ordnance Survey territorial divisions, some of which were not recognised after the 1840s.

The National Archives hold the original Tithe Applotment Books only for the twenty-six counties of the Republic of Ireland. The books for the six counties of Northern Ireland are held in the Public Record Office of Northern Ireland in Belfast. (http://titheapplotmentbooks.nationalarchives.ie/search/tab/aboutmore.jsp)

Tithes Applotment – Cappanalaurabaun

Robt Cashin & Saml Pidgeon & Co had 3 acres of 2nd quality land paying 1s, 3 acres of 3rd quality paying 3d. & 60 acres of 5th quality land paying 1/8d. Richard Martin Esq received 2s & 2¼d, James Daly 1s & 1¼d & James Wilson 1s & 1d.

http://titheapplotmentbooks.nationalarchives.ie/reels/tab//004587459/004587459_00439.pdf

Griffiths Valuation 1850’s

In Griffith’s Valuation the area was 182 acres, 3 roods & 2 perches with a land value of £6-5s-0d. Value of Buildings was £7-0s-0d, and the total value is £13-5s-0d.

Occupiers

Andrew Ray & the Irish Church Mission.  The School-house & lands held by the Irish Church Mission had an exemption.

Immediate Lessor: Directors of the Law Life Assurance Co.

http://www.askaboutireland.ie/griffith-valuation/index.xml?action=doPlaceSearch&Submit.x=31&Submit.y=10&Submit&freetext=Cappanalaurabaun&countyname=Galway&baronyname=&unionname=&parishname=Kilcummin

Population & Census Information

Census 1841-1891

1841- 5 houses with 23 people

1851 – 3 houses with 22 people

1861 – 5 houses with 33 people

1871 – 3 houses with 8 people

1881 -2 houses 12 people (6 males & 6 females) Valuation of Houses & Lands £14 5s 0d.

1891 – 2 houses 9 people (4 males & 5 females) Valuation of Houses & Lands £7 5s 0d.

1901 Census  Cappanalaurabaun

This is a return of the members of the family, their Visitors, Boarders, and Servants who slept or abode in their house on the night of Sunday March 31st 1901 in Cappanalaurabaun

There were 2 houses listed in the Townland of Cappanalaurabaun. Of the people living in Cappanalaurabaun all 6 were Church of Ireland.

People that lived in Cappanalaurabaun were born in Co. Galway.

There were a total of 3 farm buildings and out offices which included cow houses & a fowl house.

Class of House: The class of house depended on the materials used in the roof, walls, number of rooms and number of front windows. A 1st class house was considered the highest standard.

Walls of the houses: The walls were of stone, brick, and concrete or of mud, wood or other perishable material. The houses in Cappanalaurabaun were built of stone, brick or concrete. There were no mud cabins.

House Occupancy: 2 houses were occupied on the night of the Census.

Enumerators Extract

http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai000840298/

House & Building Return

http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai000840299/

Out Offices & Farm Steading

http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai000840300/

House 1

Luke Connor aged 65, head of the family, a widower he lived with his son Matthias aged 23 & daughters Mary Jane aged 21 & Ellen aged 19.

Luke was a farmer; Matthias was a farmer’s son.  Mary Jane & Ellen were farmer’s daughters. Luke could read. Matthias, Mary Jane & Ellen could read & write. Luke spoke Irish & English. They lived in a 3rd class house with 2 rooms and 2 front windows. They also had 2 Cow houses & 1 Fowl House. This premise was a Private Dwelling.

http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/pages/1901/Galway/Letterfore/Cappanalaurabaun/1394452/

House 2

Matthias Connor aged 70, head of the family, a widower he lived alone. He was born in Roscommon.

Matthias was a farmer; he could read & write and spoke Irish & English. He lived in a 2nd class house with 2 rooms and 3 front windows. He had no out buildings. This premise was a Private Dwelling.

http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/pages/1901/Galway/Letterfore/Cappanalaurabaun/1394453/

Census 1911 Cappanalaurabaun

This is a return of the Members of the families in Cappanalaurabaun, their visitors, boarders and servants who slept or abode in the house on the night of Sunday 2nd April 1911.

There were 2 houses listed in the Townland of Cappanalaurabaun. People that lived in Cappanalaurabaun were born included Co. Galway & Roscommon. There were a total of 3 farm buildings and out offices which included a cow houses, piggeries and shed. Of the people living in Cappanalaurabaun all 4 (3 males, 1 female) were Church of Ireland. 

Class of House: The class of house depended on the materials used in the roof, walls, number of rooms and number of front windows. A 1st class house was considered the highest standard.

Walls of the houses: The walls were of stone, brick, and concrete or of mud, wood or other perishable material. The houses in Cappanalaurabaun were built of stone, brick or concrete. There were no mud cabins.

House Occupancy: 2 houses were occupied on the night of the Census.

Enumerators Extract

http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai002434765/

House & Building Return

http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai002434768/

Out Offices & Farm Steading

http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai002434770/

House 1

Luke Connor aged 73, head of the family, a widower he lived with his son Matthias aged 27 & daughter Ellen aged 24.

Luke was a farmer; Matthias was a farmer’s son. Luke could read. Matthias & Ellen could read & write. Luke spoke Irish & English. They lived in a 2nd class house with 2 rooms and 3 front windows. They also had 1 Cow house, 1 Piggery, & 1 Shed. This premise was a Private Dwelling.

http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/pages/1911/Galway/Letterfore/Cappanalaurabaun/912147/

House 2

Matthias Connor aged 70, head of the family, a widower he lived alone. He was born in Roscommon.

Matthias was a farmer; he could read & write and spoke Irish & English. He lived in a 3rd class house with 2 rooms and 2 front windows. He had no out buildings. This premise was a Private Dwelling.

http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/pages/1911/Galway/Letterfore/Cappanalaurabaun/912148/

Maps

It is located at 53° 28′ 29″ N, 9° 28′ 14″ W.

Google Maps

https://www.google.ie/maps/place/Cappanalaurabaun,+Co.+Galway/@53.4747757,-9.4831369,15z/data=!3m1!4b1!4m2!3m1!1s0x485bcf174751b459:0x31492a19a702d9f0?hl=en

Information from Irishtownlands.ie website

http://www.townlands.ie/galway/moycullen/kilcummin/letterfore/cappanalaurabaun/

No information on townland of Cappanalaurabaun on the places.galwaylibrary.ie website.

 

CAPPANALAURABAUN  (taken from the local publication) “A Valley Remembers GLANN”

Ceapach Na Laura Baine, The field of the white foal.

Area 184 acres

This townland is at the most westerly end of the Glann valley, and is the last but by no means the least when it comes to history, for the purposes of this project. It is afforested having been planted in the sixties by the state. It was at that time in 1962 while working on the planting of this area that Stephen Joyce from Gowlan got killed with lightning. The exact place is close to the southern boundary high up where Curraun Hill and Curraun More meet. Some sections have now been harvested. In the 1640s the land here was granted to an Owen McDonnell.There is no record available for the 1850s.

At the time of the 1911 census there were two families living here. Luke Connor and his two children Mathias and Ellen. After Luke passed away Mathais and Ellen went to live in Oughterard in a house in Camp Street, opposite McGeough’s Butcher shop which is now owned by Pat and Ann Joyce.

Ellen died in 1948 and Mathias died sometime between 1953 and 1956. They are both buried in Church of Ireland grounds Oughterard. The other family was Mathias Connor, presumably a brother of Luke and he lived near the old school on the eastern side of the townland. It is possible that he would have been the caretaker for the school. Around 1922 Jim Murphy of Cornamona acquired Cappanalaurabaun and lived in the house of Luke Connor. This is at the place called the “rabbit hill”! He was married and had one son named Jim who was better known as Bobby to those that remembered him. Bobby’s mother died when he was young and his Father; Jim got married again to Sarah Butler (Walter’s sister). They had three daughters Maris and Angela, who were twins and Phil. Before Phil was born this family had moved to Tullavrick (Where Larry Higgins later lived). They then moved in to 34 Prospect Hill Galway. Before this Bobby went away to England as a stowaway on a ship from Galway docks and could not be traced. His father Jim went to try and find him on a number of occasions but was unsuccessful. On one of these searches in England, Jim developed pneumonia and died. He is buried in Birmingham. In 1990 through Martin Nee from Leenane, Christy Butler made contact with Bobby Murphy who at that stage had spent most of his life as a plasterer in England. Christy went over to meet him and they saw one another for the first time in over sixty years, thereafter he kept in regular touch by phone and letter until he passed away in Dec 2004 aged 88 years. He is buried in Brixton, London. Maris and Angela are both deceased having married and had families. They both lived in Dublin. Phil married and still lives in Canada.

There are the remains of one other house in Cappanalaura. It is past the school on the right hand side of the road. This was known as Frank’s house.

A ferry operated from Cappanalaura to Doon and all sorts of goods and even horses could be carried on it. This was also used to ferry children from Glann to Castlekirke School in Doon. On the 19th August 1852 the protestant Bishop of Tuam laid the foundation stone for the school in Capnalaurabaun. The piers on respective sides of the lake still exist today. The ruins of the old school are to be found to the left of the roadway close to the boundary with Curraun more. This was a project undertaken by Mrs Blake of Doon with the help of Rev. Alexander Dallas of the Irish Church Missions. Mrs Blake was the wife of a retired British army Captain who bought Doon house in 1844.

 

 

This page was added on 15/02/2015.

Comments about this page

  • Regarding previous post on Rev. William Kennedy, please note that “Ballynahinch” should read “BUNLAHINCH”, Louisburgh, Co. Mayo, commonly known as “Clapper Bridge”.

    Jim Fahy
    25-3-2017

    By Jim Fahy (25/03/2017)
  • Rev. William Kennedy is recorded at page 35 in “Soupers and Jumpers” by Miriam Moffitt – 2008. Apparently he was a convert from Rome. It appears that his mission area was Castlekerke, Ballynahinch? and Dublin.
    No further information.

    Church of Ireland Library, Churchtown, Dublin may have some detail on him.

    Jim Fahy
    25 – 3 – 2017

    By Jim Fahy (25/03/2017)
  • Dear Jim Fahey, Thank you very much for posting the above information about John Brice Blake. This confirms his date and place of death at Doon House on 5 March 1858 and adds burial information that I did not have. There is more about Doon Cottage (House), that still exists, on the Landed Estates Database and Griffiths Valuation (parish of Cong).
    Frances McIllree (eldest sister of one of my GGF’s) married first at Belturbet, on 25 July 1825, Captain William Kennedy of Grafton Street, Dublin. (She must have been very young about 16 or 17). According to family papers “Captain Kennedy died within the year leaving Frances well off)”. So far I have not been able to locate any information about his death. Am also wondering if he could have been in JB Blake’s 47th Regiment. An intriguing bit of information in Griffiths Valuation is a record about the Reverend William Kennedy who was a Blake tenant at Drumsnauv school in 1855. Interested to know more about the Rev. Kennedy. Jane Morrison (12/03/2017)

    By Jane Morrison (11/03/2017)
  • Re: Death of John Brice Blake:

    Galway Vindicatorof March 10th 1858 reported the death of John Brice Blake at Doon House, Outerard on March 5th I858. Burial took place in Menlo.

    Press Reports:
    Captain John Brice Blake
    Ensign: June 1830, Lieutenant, December 1833 – (War Office) Marriage to Miss Frances McIllree of Belturbet on July 1st 1840, County Galway Grand Jury, July 1841, (address: Drumsna), appointed as Magistrate for County Galway, November 1841.

    Jim Fahy
    February 23rd 2017

    By Jim Fahy (23/02/2017)
  • It appears that there are some typos in this ‘history’. John Brice Blake died at Doon House on 5 March 1858, so could not have bought the property in 1944. Also as far as our family history tells us, John Blake inherited the house and Drumsnauv and Castlekirk estates from his father. You may wish to check the Landed Estates Database for more information.

    By Jane Morrison (11/02/2017)

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